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Patient Care Heroes Group

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A Card Merely Thought Of Pdf


Gift cards can be a convenient present for the holidays and special occasions. While they seem simple, it is important that both the giver and the recipient read the details for each card to avoid any misunderstandings, and there might be additional policies set by the merchant or bank issuing the card.




a card merely thought of pdf



The Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure (Credit CARD) Act provides several protections for consumers who purchase certain types of gift cards, including store and restaurant (also known as merchant) gift cards. These cards can only be redeemed at the stores and restaurants that sell them. Bank gift cards, which carry the logo of a payment card network (e.g., Visa, MasterCard), are also subject to Credit CARD Act protections and can be used wherever the brand is accepted.


Under the law, a gift card cannot expire until at least five years from the date it was activated. The law also places general limitations on fees. For instance, the card issuer cannot charge a dormancy or inactivity fee on a gift card unless there has been no activity for one year and the card clearly states its policy toward that fee. In addition, some states have separate laws that provide added protection in certain circumstances.


Another common scam is someone who poses as an attorney for a family member and claims that the family member is in trouble with the law and needs assistance. They contact you by phone or email, and ask you to purchase gift cards in specific amounts to pay them. These are all red flags to a scam, and once you purchase the gift cards, the scammers will tell you to provide them with the code numbers and PINs that are usually located on the back of cards so that the scammer can redeem them.


In addition, you should immediately report the scam to the merchant or company that issued the card and ask if they can refund your money. Most issuers have toll-free telephone numbers available online, so you can call to report a lost or stolen card. You might get back the money left on the card or a portion of it, and sometimes there is a fee when they provide a refund, but still worth reporting. You may need to provide the receipt and the card number, so be sure to keep record of that information.


If you are a dependent of a Service member and the Service member is called to active duty for 31 days or more, you and your sponsor should fill out a DD Form 1172-2. This application, along with the surrender of DD Form 1173-1, will allow dependents to receive the DD Form 1173. This card is needed to gain access to medical benefits and continued access to commissary, exchange, MWR, and other privileges.


You are responsible for keeping your ID card in good condition, and you are the only person allowed to use the card. Any person willfully altering, damaging, lending, counterfeiting, or using these cards in an unauthorized manner is subject to fine or imprisonment or both. Unauthorized or fraudulent use of ID cards would exist if bearers used the card to obtain benefits and privileges to which they are not entitled. Examples of authorized photocopying include photocopying of DoD ID cards to facilitate medical care processing, check cashing, voting, tax matters, compliance with appendix 501 of title 50, U.S.C. (also known as "The Servicemember's Civil Relief Act"), or administering other military-related benefits to eligible beneficiaries.


If you lose your Uniformed Services ID Card, you should go to the nearest Real-Time Automated Personnel Identification System (RAPIDS) site and obtain your new card. You can use the RAPIDS Site Locator to find your nearest RAPIDS site.


Updating information on your card starts with updating information in DEERS. Once you are registered in DEERS, you are responsible for keeping your DEERS records updated when your personal eligibility information changes. This includes changes in military career status, addresses, and family status (marriage, divorce, birth, and adoption).


All DoD ID cards are property of the U.S. Government and shall be returned upon separation, resignation, firing, termination of contract or affiliation with the DoD, or upon any other event in which the individual no longer requires the use of such ID card.


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